GLIIFCA 30 Meeting Links

General Instructions/FAQ:

  • Each day will have four zoom links. After one segment is complete, you will need to click the next zoom link to join the next section. The conference organizers will also provide provide guidance throughout the day.
  • This meeting will be interactive! We encourage you to participate fully by using your microphone and webcam – especially in the Vendor Fair and Roundtables. 
  • Most of this meeting will NOT be recorded. The only sessions that will be recorded are the Tech Talks.
  • During the Vendor Fair you will be free to move about the breakout rooms as you choose
  • During the Roundtables please select one room only and do not move to another room in the middle of the session. No pre-selection is required, just choose a room at the time of the session.
  • A raffle will be held a the end of each day

If you need technical help with zoom please email gliifca@gmail.com.

GLIIFCA DAY 1 (Tuesday)

GLIIFCA DAY 2 (Wednesday)

GLIIFCA DAY 1 – ADD TO CALENDAR

GLIIFCA DAY 2 – ADD TO CALENDAR

Zoom Links for All Sessions

The conference starts at 9AM EDT/8AM CDT

Scientific Talks 1 zoom linkjump to schedule

Vendor Fair 1 zoom linkjump to schedule

Tech Talks 1 zoom linkjump to schedule

Roundtables 1 zoom linkjump to schedule

Scientific Talks 2 zoom linkjump to schedule

Vendor Fair 2 zoom linkjump to schedule

Tech Talks 2 zoom linkjump to schedule

Roundtables 2 zoom linkjump to schedule

Make sure you update zoom to the newest version to make sure you have access to all of the features. Quick tips for attending the vendor fair and roundtables:

Full Schedule

Tuesday, September 14, 2021

ALL TIMES ARE IN EDT

Scientific Talk Session 1

Zoom link

GLIIFCA President

Scientific Talk: “Patient-derived cancer organoid tracking using label-free optical imaging to assess treatment response”

Abstract:Patient-derived cancer organoids are in vitro organotypic models that reflect in vivo tumor drug response, and allow for quickly administering and monitoring multiple drug combinations in a clinically relevant timeframe. Here, we show that two label-free optical technologies, redox imaging and optical coherence tomography, can provide sensitive readouts of cancer drug sensitivity without the use of destructive processing. These novel approaches for cancer drug screening have relevance in both drug development and clinical treatment planning.

Speaker: Daniel A. Gil, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Texas at Austin

Sponsor: GLIIFCA

Stretch, get some more coffee, watch short videos provided by this year’s sponsors.

Scientific Talk: “Single Vesicle Flow Cytometry: Just Like Measuring Cells, But Different”

Abstract: All cells released extracellular vesicles (EVs), which have many of the same properties of cells including a lipid bilayer membrane, surface markers, and internal components such as proteins, nucleic acids and other biomolecules. However, EVs are ~100-times smaller (in diameter), and ~10,000-fold (for fluorescence) to ~1,000,000-fold (for scatter) dimmer, compared to cells, which challenges conventional instruments and assays. Fortunately, with the rational application of fundamental flow cytometry principles and best practices, and properly optimized and calibrated flow cytometry instruments and assays, it is possible to measure individual EVs as small as 50 nm and cargo and cargo to less than 10 molecules/EV.

Speaker: John Nolan, Scintillon Institute

Sponsor: Leinco

Stretch, get some more coffee, watch short videos provided by this year’s sponsors.


Vendor Fair featuring Sponsor Breakout Rooms 1

Zoom link

10:45 – 11:15 EDT  Visit our generous sponsors for an opportunity to discuss technologies, reagents, software, etc., in dedicated breakout rooms. Be sure to have your microphone and webcam ready so you can interact with the sponsors!

11:15 – 11:20 EDT   Break:  Stretch, get some more coffee, watch short videos provided by this year’s sponsors


Technology Session featuring Sponsor Tech Talks 1

Zoom link

All attendees will be muted and attendee webcams will be turned off for this session.

Speaker: Colleen Urben, NanoString Technologies, Inc

Abstract: This presentation will cover a brief overview of our spatial profiling solutions from NanoString Technologies, which allow you to image and profile over 100 proteins and up to the whole transcriptome.  This will allow the exploration of any target and any pathway in biological regions of interest and segment compartments across your samples.

Speaker: Irene Gonzalez, Cytognos

Abstract: Cytognos is a clinical flow cytometry company providing solutions for Onco Hematology, Clinical Immunology, and Clinical Trials that can help in standardizing your laboratory practice while improving patient care.

Speaker: Leesa Pennell, BioLegend

Abstract: In this talk we will introduce our novel Apotracker™ reagents that identify apoptotic and necrotic cells through calcium-independent mechanisms. Apotracker™ binding can be performed in standard flow cytometry buffers, reducing cytotoxicity risk from the use of specialized buffers.

Stretch, get some more coffee, watch short videos provided by this year’s sponsors.

Roundtable Discussion Session 1

Zoom link

11:55 – 12:50 EDT Choose one of the Breakout Rooms listed below for a lively and interactive discussion led by experts in the topic. There is no advance signup. Please stay in the room for the entire session, do not bounce around between rooms. These are live sessions and will not be recorded. Be sure to have your microphone and webcam ready so you can participate!

12:50 – 1:00 EDT Raffle and Wrap up. After the roundtables are completed all participants will automatically be moved to the final wrap up session.

Abstract: This is an exciting era for flow cytometry. Expanding reagent portfolios, new fluorescent molecules, and more instrument options give investigators novel opportunities to explore deeper, more meaningful biological questions. While the basic principles of flow cytometry panel design still apply, working in a high-dimensional biology space requires more theoretical consideration and practical troubleshooting when designing experiments. In this session, we will discuss approaches and challenges when designing and evaluating high-dimensional panels for optimal resolution.

Roundtable Leaders:

Laura Johnston, University of Chicago

David Morris, BD Biosciences

Sponsor: BD Biosciences

Abstract: Come join us to learn more about ISAC’s Shared Resource Laboratory (SRL) Recognition Program. We’ll discuss details about the program, including benefits, the application and review process, renewal and continuing service to the flow cytometry community. We’ll have plenty of time to answer questions, hear your feedback and discuss the future of the program.

Roundtable Leaders:

Michael Gregory, Cleveland Clinic Florida Research and Innovation Center

Kathy Daniels, Whitehead Institute

Sponsor: GLIIFCA

Abstract: Are we approaching the role of autofluorescence in flow cytometry analysis the wrong way? With the shift of flow cytometry to higher parameter instruments and spectral analysis, how can our view of autofluorescence change? This roundtable will touch upon these and other important concepts of cellular autofluorescence and allow the participants to discuss their current challenges and provide a forum for discussion and gather feedback from the organizers and participants.

Roundtable Leaders:

Monica DeLay, Cytek Biosciences

David Galbraith, University of Arizona

Sponsor:  GLIIFCA

Abstract: EVs are small, dim, and difficult to measure. Sensitive instruments are necessary but not sufficient to measure EVs. Rigorous and reproducible EV FC measurements require assays that include the necessary standards, controls, and procedures to prepare samples that are measured on calibrated instruments, as well as the data analysis procedures that enable reporting of results in standardized units. These issues were addressed in the recent MIFlowCyt-EV guidelines published in the Journal of Extracellular Vesicles. Join us to discuss the questions: Is my instrument sensitive enough to detect EVs? How do I know those events I detected were actually EVs? How should I analyze EV FC data and what should I report?

Roundtable Leaders:

John Nolan, Scintillon Institute

Tom Maslanik, Cellarcus

Sponsor:  Cellarcus

Abstract: Flow cytometry is an essential tool for the diagnosis and management of disease and can be adapted to answer challenging diagnostic questions. The development and validation of flow cytometry assays for clinical use presents particular challenges, including addressing regulatory requirements. We shall discuss the key aspects of test validation from conceptualization to ‘going live’ and how we practically implement them in our laboratory.

Roundtable Leaders:

Mary Reynaud, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

Sam Chiang, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

Sponsor:  GLIIFCA

Abstract: During this round table we will discuss the communication and planning required to set up a research pipeline that involves more than one core facility, as well as the information feedback loop that must be established to keep the pipeline moving smoothly.

Roundtable Leaders:

Lauren Nettenstrom, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center Flow Cytometry Laboratory

Sponsor: Akadeum

Wednesday, September 15, 2021

ALL TIMES ARE IN EDT

Scientific Talk Session 2

Zoom link

GLIIFCA President

Scientific Talk: Single Cell Genomics Applications for the Flow Cytometry SRL

Abstract: This talk will focus on the most common single-cell applications currently popular in the field, giving a basic primer on how each assay works and common pitfalls when it comes to cell sorting or downstream processing.  A new application will also be highlighted leveraging spectral and 8-way cell sorting for 10x Genomics single-cell RNA-seq.

Speaker: Patricia Rogers, Associate Director Flow Cytometry Facility, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Sponsor: Sony Biotechnology

Stretch, get some more coffee, watch short videos provided by this year’s sponsors.

Scientific Talk: “The Ongoing Evolution of SARS-CoV-2: Causes, Consequences, and Implications”

Abstract:  As COVID-19 pandemic continues around the globe, the virus behind the disease continues to evolve. Understanding the biological, clinical, and epidemiological consequences of newly arising SARS-CoV-2 mutations is critical to informing public health policy and minimizing human risk. In this talk, we will discuss the tools being used to track and characterize new genetic variants of SARS-CoV-2 and the new technologies being devised to better understand the drivers of viral evolution.

Speaker: Judd F. Hultquist, Ph.D., Division of Infectious Diseases, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern

Sponsor: Proteintech Group, Inc

Stretch, get some more coffee, watch short videos provided by this year’s sponsors.


Vendor Fair featuring Sponsor Breakout Rooms 2

Zoom link

10:45 – 11:15 EDT Visit our generous sponsors for an opportunity to discuss technologies, reagents, software, etc., in dedicated breakout rooms. Be sure to have your microphone and webcam ready so you can interact with the sponsors!

11:15 – 11:20 EDT Break:  Stretch, get some more coffee, watch short videos provided by this year’s sponsors


Technology Session featuring Sponsor Tech Talks 2

Zoom link

All attendees will be muted and attendee webcams will be turned off for this session.

Speaker: Vinicius Motta, Fluidigm

Abstract: CyTOF XT™: the most technologically advanced and affordable mass cytometer to date, builds on the benefits of CyTOF technology while simplifying operation, automating sample acquisition and providing real-time signal optimization. Significant reductions in cost of instrument, installation, and operation make CyTOF XT™ accessible to all.

Speaker: Nikki Nguyen, Immudex

Abstract: Capturing the full spectrum of an immune response is critical for innovation in diagnosis, treatment, and development for new therapies. Immudex Dextramer® and dCODE® Dextramer technologies enable highly sensitive detection of immune cells to provide a complete immune profile when paired with flow cytometry and next generation sequencing.

Speaker: Mark A. Barnes, Miltenyi Biotec

Abstract: Expression and detection of Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CAR) are critical steps in engineered T cell and NK cell therapy processes.  Here we review Miltenyi Biotec’s approach to standardize and enhance detection of CAR molecules.

Stretch, get some more coffee, watch short videos provided by this year’s sponsors.

Roundtable Discussion Session 2

Zoom link

11:55 – 12:50 EDT Choose one of the Breakout Rooms listed below for a lively and interactive discussion led by experts in the topic. There is no advance signup. Please stay in the room for the entire session, do not bounce around between rooms. These are live sessions and will not be recorded. Be sure to have your microphone and webcam ready so you can participate!

12:50 – 1:00 EDT Raffle and Wrap up. After the roundtables are completed all participants will automatically be moved to the final wrap up session.

Abstract: Are you interested in converting your current training program to a virtual platform or has your Core already converted to a virtual platform? We will be joined by vendor Sponsors, who will share their experiences with virtual instrument training and support. Please join us to discuss some of the following topics, as well as share your own experiences.

  • Onboarding new users
  • Project-specific remote support
  • Asynchronous Virtual Training
  • Assessing Virtual Training impact
  • Synchronous (hands-on) Virtual Training

Roundtable Leaders:

Matt Bernard, Michigan State University Flow Cytometry Core Facility

Daniel Vocelle, Michigan State University Flow Cytometry Core Facility

Matthew Goff, Beckman Coulter

Sponsor: Beckman Coulter Life Sciences

Abstract: This roundtable discussion will focus on a few different topics:

  1. What are the current pain points when working with the genomics core facility?
  2. Creating strategies to strengthen relationships between cores.
  3. Discussing the actual tools needed to set up a shared flow genomics core facility.
  4. How to think about generating revenue beyond flow cytometry services. 

Roundtable Leaders: Patricia Rogers, Broad Institute

Sponsor:

Abstract: Scientists across a range of disciplines are turning to the power of flow cytometry to understand their cells of interest. These non-mammalian samples (yeast, bacteria, plankton, parasites, pollen, etc.) often lack the multitude of tools that have been developed for many flow cytometry applications. Blending image based flow cytometry with conventional flow provides an important window into understanding these historically less common flow applications. Join us to discuss how this combination of tools can be leveraged in these uncommon samples, and in more traditional applications.

Roundtable Leaders:

Kathryn Fox, Carbone Cancer Center Flow Cytometry Laboratory, University of Wisconsin

Rob Thacker, Luminex Corporation

Zoe Rousch, Luminex Corporation

Sponsor:  Luminex Corporation

Abstract: We’ll have a discussion about some of the fundamental, practical differences between traditional and spectral cytometry.  Specifically we’ll discuss troubleshooting data and additional conditional choices to consider in panel building.

Roundtable Leaders:

David Leclerc, University of Chicago

Kelly Lundsten, ThermoFisher Scientific

Sponsor:  ThermoFisher Scientific

Abstract: Shared resource laboratories must periodically bring in new instruments to keep up with evolving technologies, growing user bases, and instrument obsolescence. When introducing new instrumentation challenges may arise especially if the new instrument has different acquisition software or operates on a different principle. In this roundtable we’ll discuss ways to ease the transition and drive usage on new instruments in an SRL setting.

Roundtable Leaders:

Rachael Sheridan, Van Andel Institute Flow Cytometry Core

Robert Archer of NanoCellect Biomedical, Inc.

Sponsor:  NanoCellect Biomedical, Inc.

Abstract: 

What is necessary before using algorithms and what steps do people take? – Compensation, Unmixing, Scaling, Time gates/flowCut, Cleanup gates

What is a workflow and what are some examples for common experiments?

What tools are people missing, or what would they like to be able to accomplish?

How do people identify and prevent batch effects?

Roundtable Leaders:

Geoff Kraker, Cytek Biosciences

Beth Hill, Verity Software House

Sponsor: Verity Software House